Tag Archives: family

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October 31st – November 4th

HUAWEI BEACH SOCCER INTERCONTINENTAL CUP

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In Action: FIFA Beach Soccer World Champions Brazil

It’s that time of year when the world’s best beach soccer players converge on Dubai to take part in the annual beach soccer tournament, Huawei Beach Soccer Intercontinental Cup. This year you’ll see world champions Brazil trying to maintain the phenomenal unbeaten run of 43 matches over the last two years, while hoping to retain the Intercontinental Cup.

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The samba boys are hot favourite this year to take out the trophy but on their tale, are the Portuguese, Russia and Iran. Also playing are the home team, UAE, while Egypt make a return to the tournament alongside Mexico and Paraguay. This event is FREE and a great way to spend the afternoon with the family. Catch all the action down on the sand at Marasi Business Bay. Make sure you get down there early to get a good parking spot otherwise catch the metro to Business Bay and hop on the free shuttle service.

 

Friday, November 3

SUPERHEROES WALKATHON

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Superhero excitement at Skydive Dubai

The Dubai Fitness Challenge carnival continues with a cool superheroes walkathon down at Skydive Dubai. The only prerequisite is that you must be in a costume to participate in the 3km walk. The route will take you through the scenic Dubai Marina Promenade.

Registration starts at 3pm while the walk starts at 4pm. Water and refreshments will be served along the way. Stick around for all the exciting activities planned after the walk as well as surprise celebrity guest appearances. Entry is FREE.

 

Friday November 10th & Saturday 11th

THE GRUFFALO

The Gruffalo Show

TALL STORIES’ THE GRUFFALO roars back to the UAE direct from London’s West End, bringing everyone’s favourite furry monster to life on stage. THE GRUFFALO is the must-see family show for lovers of the timeless story and everyone looking for a smashing day out!

TALL STORIES’ hit musical adaptation of the much-loved picture book by JULIA DONALDSON and AXEL SCHEFFLER will perform at MADINAT THEATRE, DUBAI on Friday the 10th and Saturday 11th of November 2017, presented by CENTRE STAGE ARTS, as the most fearsome creature that never was – but is, takes to the stage in this enchanting production with the perfect combination of songs, laughter, physical theatre and just the right amount of scary fun! Set to a wonderfully catchy score with original music and lyrics, THE GRUFFALO continues to entertain audiences the world over.

Tickets start from AED135 and are available from Virgin Megastores and Madinat Theatre.

Friday, November 17TH

GEORGE’S MARVELLOUS MEDICINE

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As part of the UK/UAE 2017 Year of Creative Collaboration led by the British Council, Art For All is delighted to announce that they will be bringing Roald Dahl smash hit stage show George’s Marvellous Medicine to the UAE in November 2017. Performed by the Birmingham Stage Company and adapted for the stage by award-winning children’s theatre director, David Wood, this acclaimed production has already proved a sell-out in the four previous times it has been performed in the UAE.

The hero of the story is George; a little boy who lives on a farm with his mum and dad, and horrible grumpy grandma – who is rather strange and tells him she’s a witch.

One day, while left in charge of grandma, George decides he’s had enough of her bullying ways, and he’s going to teach her a lesson. Instead of giving her a dose of her normal medicine, he sets about making one of his own – with extraordinary results… An absolutely brilliant tale that stays true to Dahl’s wonderfully imaginative story, audiences are in for a huge treat.

Tickets are available from AED150 and are available at Ductac and Virgin Tickets.

 

Dubai: November 24 & 25

GOLDILOCKS & THE THREE BEARS

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As part of the UK/UAE 2017 Year of Creative Collaboration led by the British Council, Art For All is delighted to announce that in November they will be bringing much-loved children’s ballet, Goldilocks & The Three Bears, to the UAE. Performed by the Northern Ballet, this beautiful production is a wonderful way to introduce little ones to the magic of live ballet, music and theatre.

At the centre of the story is Goldilocks – a mischievous little girl with hair as bright as gold. On the look out for an adventure she sneaks out of her house one day and finds her way into the woods. A chance encounter with Blue Bird and Fox leads her into a game of hide and seek, which in turn finds her stumbling across the Bear’s woodland cottage. Nobody is home, but she finds three bowls of delicious porridge in the kitchen. Perhaps just a little taste… But what will Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Little Bear say when they return home? You’ll have to wait and see…

Tickets available from Virgin Tickets. This show runs for 40 minutes and is suitable for children 2+

Dubai – When: November 24 and 25 Location: Madinat Theatre

Tickets from AED125

Abu Dhabi – When: November 27  Location: National Theatre

Tickets from AED110

 

 

LETTING GO : Getting ready for nursery

 

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Art Village Nursery Open Day

This would be the hardest decision I would have to make.

My baby girl wrapped her arms around my neck as we walked in to our first nursery open day. I thought it was going to be as easy as it had been for my other children, but Amalia just held on. The teachers at Art Village Nursery invited Amalia to take a seat next to them and paint, but she wasn’t interested. I knew she would take time to warm up. Even my older daughters, aged 12, 11 and nine, now all sitting around the table and painting masks, were unsuccessful in encouraging Amalia to take part in all the wonderful activities on offer.

And then it dawned on me: how was I going to let go? I had quite forgotten about the challenges I now faced in sending a child off to nursery for the first time.

Deciding whether to keep Amalia home for another year or send her to a nursery was playing on my mind. Following our recent visit home to Australia, I realised how much she enjoyed spending time with children her own age. Although she plays regularly with her sisters, it’s not the same. Watching her learn to share toys was fascinating. In the beginning she screamed and struggled with her cousins, but as the days and weeks passed Amalia learned to share.

Now, more than ever, nursery is becoming more of a necessity for her development.

It has been seven years since I had a child in nursery and I feel as if I am back at square one, searching and investigating all the possibilities before I make a final decision.

In 2008, when I moved to the United Arab Emirates, 32 weeks pregnant with my third child, Abu Dhabi was a developing city, and unlike Dubai, nurseries were scarce and fees were high. Every door I knocked on was quickly closed. “Sorry, we’re full,” was the common response. These nurseries were plush; nothing was comparable to what was on offer back home in Sydney, Australia.

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Janah & Serene ready for nursery in Abu Dhabi

Eventually I did find something: a Montessori nursery close to where we settled. Then came the shock. Janah, now 12, had to sit for an interview with the nursery director, who was very selective of whom she would take in. As a mother, I felt intimidated and nervous. What if my child wasn’t good enough?

Thankfully, Janah met all the requirements; however, I was surprised that a nursery could be so selective of such young children. The director said she didn’t want any “disruptive” children, and in a split second my eyes shot across to my second child, Serene, who was becoming rowdy and restless as her baby sister slept behind her in the pram.

So much has changed. Although the selection of nurseries is now wider and the choices better, letting go of Amalia is the real challenge. While she was very apprehensive in the beginning, she began to settle down and enjoy what was on offer at Art Village Nursery. It’s important that the children also visit the nursery during open day, to see how they interact with teachers.

The nursery boasts 11 rooms including a library, atelier (Art & Design room), dining room and Dance & Movement room. In the outdoor area there are the all-important sand area, slide area, and gardening area. For safety reasons the nursery does not have a swimming pool but it does offer lots of water activities.

Once I knew Amalia was settled, it was my cue to catch up with Nina Farokhfal, the managing director, to learn more about this award-winning nursery.

She reassured me that all parents have the option of staying with their child on their first day, until he or she had settled in. I don’t recall this being an option at any other nursery I had visited over the years. If possible, it’s certainly an option every parent should take up, as there is nothing more frightening for a child than to be dropped off at a strange place with no familiar faces around.

Ms Farokhfal recalled being traumatised as a child when her parents dropped her off at a nursery in Germany, shortly after immigrating from Iran and unable to speak the language.

Located in Jumeriah 2, the Art Village Nursery is a branch of the award-winning Amadeus Preschool in Stockholm, Sweden. It is a Reggio Emilia inspired nursery, which values the child as strong, capable and resilient; rich with wonder and knowledge.

“When a parent is searching for a nursery they should look for one that meets their needs,” Ms Farokhfal said.

At Art Village Nursery, she added, children take part in the four areas of learning: Song & Music, Dance & Movement, Theatre & Drama, and Art & Design. They explore each area throughout their day, making learning fun and engaging while at the same time developing their educational, emotional, social and creative capabilities.

Throughout my chat with Ms Farokhfal, Amalia was nowhere to be seen. There were no more tears, just laughter as I walked in on her and her older sister playing in the toddlers’ room. The experience was a little more difficult on me than on her, as it simply confirmed that my baby girl was ready for nursery. It was also a reminder that it takes a child time to settle in to a new environment.

Art Village Nursery will certainly be on my shortlist when we decide next year where to send Amalia to nursery.

 

Art Village Nursery accepts children from 1 to 4 years. The nursery is also affiliated with Hartland International School and Clarion School. Registration for the 2017 – 2018 academic school year are open. For more details please call +971 4 288 6502 or email info@artvillagenursery.com. You can also visit www.artvillagenursery.com

[Disclaimer: This story is sponsored by Art Village Nursery]

 

 

 

 

FACING YOUR FEARS

Encouraging Adults to Learn to Swim

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Adult learn to swim students

In March, I faced one of my greatest fears head on. I embarked on a challenge to learn to swim. I’ve spoken about it previously on my blog but what I haven’t done is share the reasons why I never learned to swim as a child and why now, at 40, I have tackled it, along the way inspiring other adults to step out of their comfort zone and overcome their fear of swimming pools.

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Absolute Swimming Academy UAE with young men who can’t swim

I grew up with my very conservative Muslim father, so when he told me as a child that I would no longer be allowed to wear a swimsuit, I found ways to avoid school swimming lessons. I was eight and embarrassed at having to jump in the water with my classmates in shorts and a T-shirt; during the 80s we didn’t have the luxury of rash tops or knee-length swimsuits like the one I wear today.

The decision I made to sit out swimming lessons led to an incident that caused me to fear swimming pools for most of my life. I recall being at a school swim gala when the teachers gathered the non-swimmers together for water games. After jumping in the water and watching my friends swim comfortably across the pool, I found myself sinking and gasping for air. I was extremely fortunate that a man saw me and dived in to save me. Until recently, whenever I couldn’t touch the bottom of the pool, my heart would race and I found myself scrambling back to the shallow end.

For 25 years, I have made excuses to avoid getting in the water and learning to swim. As the mother of four girls, I made sure that my eldest three learned to swim from a young age and that they have confidence in the pool and ocean. Empowering them with these skills has made me feel confident about them being around swimming pools; I didn’t want to pass my fears on to them. My youngest is 18 months and she is now getting in the pool and learning to swim.

As part of my 40 before 40 challenge, where I set out to do 40 things before I turned 40, I had swimming at the top of my list. After five lessons, I began swimming 25 metres without fearing the deep end. I had learned the necessary skills to keep myself afloat while breathing and kicking. It was one of the most liberating feelings.

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Speaking to the Gulf News in Dubai  about my learn to swim journey

After sharing my story on Instagram (@arabianmum), I was inundated with messages from adults who had not learned to swim. They had been embarrassed for so long, but after following my journey they were encouraged to face their fears. A popular radio show in Dubai, Virgin Radio’s the Kris Fade Show, aired my story, sparking a flood of calls and messages to the programme.

Myself and the presenters of the Kris Fade Show teamed up with Absolute Swimming UAE, where I have been learning to swim, to offer a group of adult non-swimmers an opportunity to learn to swim. The impact was immediate. Local UAE media supported the campaign as did UAE-based Serbian Olympian and two-time European swimming champion Velimir Stjepanovic.

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Velimir Stjepanovic joins the campaign

Swimming is a necessity. So often we assume and take for granted that everyone around us knows how to swim. Learning to swim, whether you’re an adult or a child, can save lives.

If you’re afraid of the water and have put off learning to swim for a while, make today the day you start. Parents, please invest in swimming lessons for your children. It may be the difference between life and death.

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Kris Fade and Priti Malik from Virgin  Radio supporting learn to swim  listeners

You can continue to follow my swimming story on Instagram (@arabianmum).

Thank you to the team at Absolute Swimming UAE, Kris Fade and the team at the Kris Fade Show for getting behind this important campaign to learn to swim.

Expat Exodus

Saying Goodbye to Friends

Living as an expat anywhere in the world means being away from your loved ones. Wherever we end up, our friends become the closest thing to family.

It’s inevitable, particularly living in the Arab world where we will never be the citizens of the country, for the expat journey to end.

The past year has been particularly difficult as one by one I’ve watched good friends make the hard decision to return to their native countries. The impact of falling oil prices has had a crippling effect on jobs across all industries.

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Geraldine and her family left Dubai in December 2015

Last Summer residents first began to witness the large exodus of expats across the region, mostly families, where one spouse had lost his or her job. Summer or Christmas are usually the most common times for families to pack up and leave, as it ensures their child’s education is not disrupted.

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I caught up with Lisa for the first time in Sydney earlier this year after she left Abu Dhabi in 2009

The high cost of living has also played a critical role in expats leaving the GCC. Some families have even opted to separate, with dad staying on and working in the region while mum and the children return home. The main trigger is the cost of education. Here in the UAE private school fees continue to rise, with some schools often charging more than USD 10,000 for kindy.

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When you’re an expat your friends are your extended family

The expat exodus has become the most talked about issue at mummy group gatherings – many said their good byes this past week as schools wrapped up for the winter break. My eldest daughter, Janah, a Year 7 student, said three children in her class would not return in the new school year.

This past week I learned that another friend left Dubai.  It’s the fifth family that has returned to their country over the last year.

As I look back on my 8.5 years in the UAE, I’m reminded of the mass exodus, post the global financial crisis. I had only been here for six months when it hit our shores. The impact was felt across all industries. We were among the few families who survived it and we watched as Dubai and neighbouring cities rebuilt.

When old friends leave, it opens the door to new friendships. I’m looking forward to welcoming newcomers to the city. To my old friends, we will always have DUBAI.

In Brief: 7DAYS to shut down   

On December 22, 2016, Dubai’s most loved newspaper, 7Days, will print its final newspaper.

The current trading environment and future global outlook for print advertising remains severely challenged,” explains 7Days CEO Mark Rix. “Whilst it was our stated intention to re-focus and restructure the business for 2017 and beyond, it has since proved not possible to create an acceptable cost base that could deliver a viable and sustainable business.

“It is therefore with great sadness that we announce the unique 7DAYS news brand will close and thus, cease to inform and entertain the UAE in its refreshing and inimitable way.”

The closure leaves about 50 people, some friends, without jobs.

 

 

Business in Arabia: Risking it all to pursue a dream

Bounce: The jumping revolution comes to the Middle East

Bounce: The jumping revolution comes to the Middle East

Australian businessman Ross Milton gave up a high-flying job to pursue a dream. MyArabia.me recently caught up with the Managing Director of Bounce to find out more about the jumping revolution in Dubai.  

Anyone who has lived in the United Arab Emirates long enough will tell you that Dubai is built on entrepreneurship.

There are two types of entrepreneurs, says Ross Milton, former global chief financial officer of Mars Food Group. The first, he says, are young and usually unrestrained by family commitments. They can tolerate risk better, because if something doesn’t pay off, they have plenty of time before retirement in which to rebound. Milton points out that these young entrepreneurs are usually unable to self-fund their ventures, and need to attract the right investors.

The second type gets to Milton’s age, (41), have saved up a reasonable amount of money and then have a crack at funding something. This is riskier, concedes Milton, who has put his life savings into creating Bounce, one of the most popular indoor sporting venues in Dubai. “I still have two young children who are at school and university is still to come.”

Ross Milton, Managing Director of Bounce Middle East

Ross Milton, Managing Director of Bounce Middle East

We meet at Bounce headquarters in Al Quoz, where we are surrounded by 80 interconnected trampolines and 500 square metres of circus-grade padding and air bags. It’s hard to believe that a year ago this was the home of dozens of offices, marble floors and slabs of concrete.

“It was extraordinary! We had big cranes tearing this place apart, cutting through the concrete, until we dropped out a whole floor,” he recalls.

It was during these times, Milton says, that he would lie awake, questioning his decision to give up a high-flying executive role to pursue a 20-year dream to start his own business.

Before moving to the United Arab Emirates in 2012, Milton was based in Los Angeles, where he was the global chief financial officer for Mars Food Group, and the company recorded $3 billion in sales. It was where he honed his entrepreneurial skills.

“As a CFO, you are the right-hand man of the CEO and you end up doing a bit of everything,” he says of his 14-year-career at Mars. Milton transferred with Mars to Dubai as the Senior Vice President of Human Resources, where he guided, trained and developed 8000 employees across Africa, India, Middle East, Commonwealth of Independent States and Central Asia. Mars, he notes, had recorded $7 billion in sales in this part of the world.

Over 150,000 people have bounced since the sporting venue opened in June 2014.

Over 150,000 people have bounced since the sporting venue opened in June 2014.

He was barely into his new role in Dubai when he decided to take the leap ‒ contrary to his long-held belief that he would start his first business back in Australia, where he has a strong personal network and a familiarity with the laws and regulations.

But in August 2013, on a visit home with his family, Milton had his first encounter with Bounce, the indoor trampoline park. Within two months, he had signed a franchise agreement, acquiring the Middle East rights.

“The United Arab Emirates, like Australia, is an entrepreneurial country. Everyone can have a crack at anything,” says Milton. “I looked at this market [Dubai], and thought, ’Oh my gosh!’ You’ve got obesity issues, kids sitting in their rooms playing games on their computers, and the climate isn’t helpful for getting outside and playing sports. As I thought more and more about it, this was the place.”

Bounce Middle East was no ordinary venture. Milton was still employed at Mars, and he says he wasn’t about to leave his job unless he could find a building and acquire the licenses.

Finding the right location was a challenge. He ruled out Jebel Ali and Dubai Investment Park as too far out for patrons. And, unlike other parts of the world where the commercial real estate market is developed, Milton discovered that none of the 30 agents he contacted had a comprehensive overview of what commercial properties were available.

“I was driving up and down the streets hoping to see a For Sale or For Rent sign,” he says, shaking his head.

The search led him to the streets of Al Quoz, a commercial area located just minutes from Mall of the Emirates. Having found the right area, his next challenge was securing a building large enough to house the space-hungry concept. Once he’d found the building, he had to get the area rezoned and obtain a sports license.

In April 2014, Milton resigned from his post at Mars, and, in June 2014, Bounce Middle East opened its doors. Since then, it has welcomed over 150,000 visitors and inspired numerous copycat businesses across Dubai.

“I learnt a lot of lessons along the way,” he says. “I think next time I would put additional clauses in contracts to give myself a little breathing space. It was a big leap. There were nights when I stared at the ceiling and wondered what I had done.”

Looking around at what he has created, Milton says, “I get to work with, train and develop young people; the average age of my team is 20 years old. I get to help develop their experience and skills.

“There is nothing better than when you have three parties running at the same time, with 60 kids running around screaming, carrying on and having a blast.”

Can you slam dunk while you're bouncing?

Can you slam dunk while you’re bouncing?

Tips

If you’re starting your first business, Milton strongly recommends you start with a franchise. Why start from scratch when there is a good concept? “You have support in branding and marketing, and assistance with execution. You just have to adapt the idea to the market.”

Milton adds, whether you’re a general manager or a business owner you’ll never be an expert in all fields. There are several key areas to understand:

  • Architecture and construction: Whether you’re starting a coffee shop or a sporting venue, you will need to think about design and layout.
  • Law: You will be dealing with contracts and tenders for construction companies.
  • Finance: Identify where the money is coming from and what the tax regulations are.
  • Personnel: If you’re planning to hire staff, what are their job descriptions? Where do you recruit them from? What benefits will they receive? And is it all in accordance with the country’s labour laws?
  • Training and development: What courses (such as first aid) will your employees need?
  • Public relations and marketing: Do you have the right digital strategy? What do you know about digital? How will you engage with, and sell into, the community? How will you stage a launch, making sure that everyone in Dubai knows about you?

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Maid in Arabia

 

“I had a dream last night that all your family was dead,” said Cherry. My jaw dropped; I tried not to show too much emotion, but deep inside, I was petrified.

I looked at my three little girls who were ages five, four and two at the time.

How on earth could I leave them in this woman’s care?

I was now living in Dubai and working on the 2010 FIFA Club World Cup. I was schedule to travel to Abu Dhabi to prepare for the opening match. I rang my colleague and told him I was ill and could not attend.

I called Tarek, who was in Saudi Arabia, and told him what Cherry had said. “Get her out of the house,” he responded. He was right. We had heard far too many frightening stories over the few years we had lived in the United Arab Emirates, such as children being abused by maids as a form of revenge against their employer. I wasn’t going to risk it.

Cherry lasted a month. After she left, I vowed never to hire another live-in nanny.I had employed Cherry through an agency in Dubai. She seemed lovely during the interview—very energetic and excited about her first job in the UAE. Cherry was from the Philippines, in her early 20s, and had just completed a nursing degree in her home country. It’s what had attracted me to her in the first place. We talked more on the way home about how she was in the country to save enough money to continue her studies. Her dream was to become a midwife.

Throughout the drive, she had appeared to be normal until I needed to reach out to stop her from falling out of the car. I had asked her whether she could shut her window, as I wanted to turn on the air conditioning—she reached for the door handle and opened the door. Whether it was a complete misunderstanding or words lost in translation, I was alarmed. Cherry apologised, and the incident was forgotten.

On the way home, Cherry and I picked up the children from the nursery and school. Moments after we had arrived home, Serene came to me and told me she didn’t like Cherry. Serene was just four, but at such a young age, she had good intuition. For the first week, I sat back and observed Cherry’s behaviour with the children. She was playful and seemed to genuinely enjoy being around the girls. Janah and Alisar appeared to like her, but something continued to bother Serene. She was unsettled, and that bothered me.Cherry’s personality changed after her second week with us. She would start work late, and on many occasions, she was rude and verbally aggressive. Hygiene was a huge problem; she would never wash her face in the morning, and if she had a runny nose, she would just wipe it on her sleeve. On numerous occasions, I had to ask her to shower. I was repulsed. It was the third week into her stay when she awoke in the morning and proceeded to tell me about her dream. I couldn’t sleep that night. The next morning, I called the agency to explain the situation. I asked Cherry to pack her bags, gave her taxi fare and sent her back to the agency.

Cherry was my second live-in nanny. She had replaced Rose who had been with me for 18 months. I didn’t realise how good I had it with Rose until Cherry walked into our life.

Rose was also from the Philippines. She was a mother of three looking to improve her family’s lifestyle back home, build a house and pay for her children’s education. Apart from being extremely emotional, crying all the time, upset at the slightest criticism, she was great with the children and adored the girls. I’d hired Rose through the same agency I used to hire Cherry.

This was my first ever experience with employing a live-in housemaid. I’d given in to pressure. I had three children under the age of three, my husband was commuting to Saudi Arabia and I was waking up six times a night attending to the girls. I had reached the point where I could no longer function on my own. I needed a break. Even if it was 30 minutes alone at Café Macchiato, just some time to gather my thoughts, it was enough.I was completely against having a stranger move into my house. At first, it was just hiring a part-time helper a few days a week. Diane worked for a cleaning company during the day and was looking for some extra work in the afternoon. Tracey had recommended I give her a go. Di was sweet and loved playing with the children. Having her with me a few days a week was a relief. She made it easy to explore the idea of finding a permanent helper. “Madam,” she would call me. I never felt comfortable with it. Unlike many of my friends, I didn’t treat Di as a servant. She was a blessing in my life, and she gave me the break and peace of mind to leave my kids alone with her if needed. We used her a great deal for babysitting in the evening when Tarek and I wanted to see a movie or have dinner nearby.As time passed and Tarek’s work situation changed after the financial crisis (more on the impact of the crisis later), I had no choice but to begin the search for a permanent housemaid. It was unusual for me considering that I had grown up in a country where servants only worked for the rich and famous.

Stay Tuned for the next instalment of “Maid in Arabia.”
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Behind my Vogue Australia article

The June issue of Vogue Australia

The June issue of Vogue Australia

On set with Vogue Australia

On set with Vogue Australia

Seven years ago, I vowed never again to write about Australia’s Middle Eastern community. But recently I felt compelled to write again following a family tragedy. If I could help one family save their son from the underworld and raise awareness about the problems driving young boys into joining gangs, I will have achieved my objective.

I was excited to have my girls featured in the article.

I was excited to have my girls featured in the article.

I had spent more than a decade of my career engulfed in the community’s problems, including youth issues, crime and lack of leadership. However, during that decade I never alluded to my own family’s problems.

My brother was caught up in the underworld, joining notorious bikie gangs. He was jailed for three years for his role in a serious assault. In July last year my brother was gunned down outside his home – his past had finally caught up with him. Miraculously he survived the shooting and today he bears the scars of his choices.

I left Australia in 2008 for my own personal reasons. It wasn’t until I arrived in the United Arab Emirates that I stopped searching for my identity. I had found a place where East meets West, and where people of all nationalities live peacefully together and respect one another’s cultures and beliefs. This was something I had never felt back in Sydney.

Read more in June’s issue of Vogue Australia……

Some more behind the scenes images

Having fun with the girls

Having fun with the girls

My little beauties getting ready for their first magazine photo shoot.

My little beauties getting ready for their first magazine photo shoot.

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