Author: Taghred Chandab

In May 2008, Taghred Chandab packed her bags and her young family to go on an adventure of a lifetime. She landed in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 32-weeks pregnant with her third child, on a humid summer’s day, the desert temperature hovering above 40-degrees. The award-winning author and journalist placed a two-year deadline on the Middle Eastern journey, five years later she is still there, living on one of the world’s most luxurious man-made islands, Palm Jumeriah, in Dubai. Born and raised in Sydney, Taghred Chandab spent over 12 years working as a journalist for both News Ltd and Fairfax Media publications, was a producer at 2UE and dabbled in a little public relations, managing the media affairs of a football club and its squad of 32-egos. In 2005, she co-wrote her first book, The Glory Garage: Growing Up Lebanese Muslim in Australia, a collection of stories about Muslims living in Australia. The book was short listed for several awards, including the 2006 NSW Premier’s Award, and received the 2006 Children’s Book Council of Australia Honour Award. Seven years have passed, and while it seems like a life-time in the publishing world, for Taghred the absence from the spotlight has given her the chance to raise her three girls, Janah (8), Serene (6.5) and Alisar (5), and reacquaint herself with her Middle Eastern roots and faith. Taghred also took a break from reporting on Islamic affairs, opting to pursue her sports and entertainment dream in the Middle East. She teamed up with Tracey Holmes to co-host Sports Talk on Dubai Eye, an affiliate of the Arabian Radio Network, as well as covering some of the biggest sporting events in the region from the 2009 FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup to the 2010 FIFA Club World Cup. She released her second book title & her debut children's book, The Perfect Flower Girl in June 2012. She now heads the PR & Communications team working on Disney Live! & Disney On Ice events in the Middle East.

FACING YOUR FEARS

Encouraging Adults to Learn to Swim

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Adult learn to swim students

In March, I faced one of my greatest fears head on. I embarked on a challenge to learn to swim. I’ve spoken about it previously on my blog but what I haven’t done is share the reasons why I never learned to swim as a child and why now, at 40, I have tackled it, along the way inspiring other adults to step out of their comfort zone and overcome their fear of swimming pools.

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Absolute Swimming Academy UAE with young men who can’t swim

I grew up with my very conservative Muslim father, so when he told me as a child that I would no longer be allowed to wear a swimsuit, I found ways to avoid school swimming lessons. I was eight and embarrassed at having to jump in the water with my classmates in shorts and a T-shirt; during the 80s we didn’t have the luxury of rash tops or knee-length swimsuits like the one I wear today.

The decision I made to sit out swimming lessons led to an incident that caused me to fear swimming pools for most of my life. I recall being at a school swim gala when the teachers gathered the non-swimmers together for water games. After jumping in the water and watching my friends swim comfortably across the pool, I found myself sinking and gasping for air. I was extremely fortunate that a man saw me and dived in to save me. Until recently, whenever I couldn’t touch the bottom of the pool, my heart would race and I found myself scrambling back to the shallow end.

For 25 years, I have made excuses to avoid getting in the water and learning to swim. As the mother of four girls, I made sure that my eldest three learned to swim from a young age and that they have confidence in the pool and ocean. Empowering them with these skills has made me feel confident about them being around swimming pools; I didn’t want to pass my fears on to them. My youngest is 18 months and she is now getting in the pool and learning to swim.

As part of my 40 before 40 challenge, where I set out to do 40 things before I turned 40, I had swimming at the top of my list. After five lessons, I began swimming 25 metres without fearing the deep end. I had learned the necessary skills to keep myself afloat while breathing and kicking. It was one of the most liberating feelings.

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Speaking to the Gulf News in Dubai  about my learn to swim journey

After sharing my story on Instagram (@arabianmum), I was inundated with messages from adults who had not learned to swim. They had been embarrassed for so long, but after following my journey they were encouraged to face their fears. A popular radio show in Dubai, Virgin Radio’s the Kris Fade Show, aired my story, sparking a flood of calls and messages to the programme.

Myself and the presenters of the Kris Fade Show teamed up with Absolute Swimming UAE, where I have been learning to swim, to offer a group of adult non-swimmers an opportunity to learn to swim. The impact was immediate. Local UAE media supported the campaign as did UAE-based Serbian Olympian and two-time European swimming champion Velimir Stjepanovic.

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Velimir Stjepanovic joins the campaign

Swimming is a necessity. So often we assume and take for granted that everyone around us knows how to swim. Learning to swim, whether you’re an adult or a child, can save lives.

If you’re afraid of the water and have put off learning to swim for a while, make today the day you start. Parents, please invest in swimming lessons for your children. It may be the difference between life and death.

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Kris Fade and Priti Malik from Virgin  Radio supporting learn to swim  listeners

You can continue to follow my swimming story on Instagram (@arabianmum).

Thank you to the team at Absolute Swimming UAE, Kris Fade and the team at the Kris Fade Show for getting behind this important campaign to learn to swim.

GIRL POWER

WHO RUNS THE WORLD?

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Revamped Ms Marvel, aka Kamala Khan

As women around the world celebrate International Women’s Day, MyArabia caught up with Sana Amanat, Marvel’s Director of Content and Character Development.

Amanat was in Dubai this week as a guest at the Emirates Airline Festival of Literature, the Middle East’s largest literature festival.

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Amanat with former U.S President Barack Obama, who referred to her as a real life superhero

The 34-year-old, from New Jersey, became a household name after co-creating Marvel’s first Muslim character, Kamala Khan, all so known as Ms Marvel.

Watch the full interview here…

Embarking on New Challenges

Learning to Ski

As I prepare to say goodbye to my thirties, I have decided to embark on a 40 before 40 challenge to bid farewell to one of the best decades of my life.

I am 40 in April.

This challenge is not about being a daredevil, instead I want it to help me make better lifestyle choices and be a little more adventurous in my forties.

On my 40 before 40 list is learning to ski. Thankfully I didn’t need to travel to Switzerland or France for this challenge. In Dubai we have the world’s largest indoor snow park, Ski Dubai, where I began my five-week ski camp earlier this week.

While I won’t be sharing my entire list, I will give you a few snap shots of some of the challenges I am facing.

Next….learn to swim.

Expat Exodus

Saying Goodbye to Friends

Living as an expat anywhere in the world means being away from your loved ones. Wherever we end up, our friends become the closest thing to family.

It’s inevitable, particularly living in the Arab world where we will never be the citizens of the country, for the expat journey to end.

The past year has been particularly difficult as one by one I’ve watched good friends make the hard decision to return to their native countries. The impact of falling oil prices has had a crippling effect on jobs across all industries.

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Geraldine and her family left Dubai in December 2015

Last Summer residents first began to witness the large exodus of expats across the region, mostly families, where one spouse had lost his or her job. Summer or Christmas are usually the most common times for families to pack up and leave, as it ensures their child’s education is not disrupted.

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I caught up with Lisa for the first time in Sydney earlier this year after she left Abu Dhabi in 2009

The high cost of living has also played a critical role in expats leaving the GCC. Some families have even opted to separate, with dad staying on and working in the region while mum and the children return home. The main trigger is the cost of education. Here in the UAE private school fees continue to rise, with some schools often charging more than USD 10,000 for kindy.

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When you’re an expat your friends are your extended family

The expat exodus has become the most talked about issue at mummy group gatherings – many said their good byes this past week as schools wrapped up for the winter break. My eldest daughter, Janah, a Year 7 student, said three children in her class would not return in the new school year.

This past week I learned that another friend left Dubai.  It’s the fifth family that has returned to their country over the last year.

As I look back on my 8.5 years in the UAE, I’m reminded of the mass exodus, post the global financial crisis. I had only been here for six months when it hit our shores. The impact was felt across all industries. We were among the few families who survived it and we watched as Dubai and neighbouring cities rebuilt.

When old friends leave, it opens the door to new friendships. I’m looking forward to welcoming newcomers to the city. To my old friends, we will always have DUBAI.

In Brief: 7DAYS to shut down   

On December 22, 2016, Dubai’s most loved newspaper, 7Days, will print its final newspaper.

The current trading environment and future global outlook for print advertising remains severely challenged,” explains 7Days CEO Mark Rix. “Whilst it was our stated intention to re-focus and restructure the business for 2017 and beyond, it has since proved not possible to create an acceptable cost base that could deliver a viable and sustainable business.

“It is therefore with great sadness that we announce the unique 7DAYS news brand will close and thus, cease to inform and entertain the UAE in its refreshing and inimitable way.”

The closure leaves about 50 people, some friends, without jobs.

 

 

Finding My Way Back

IMG_9675Almost two years have passed since my last post. I can remember the day I lost my passion to write: it was not long after I found out I was pregnant with my fourth child.

Since then I’ve given birth to a beautiful baby girl, Amalia, but the journey to this point has been long. Once, writing was my way of processing what was happening in my world. It was the easiest way to vent or to express happy moments. Written words were far more powerful than spoken.

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I’m slowly coming back. There is so much to tell you. My battle with prenatal depression was perhaps the main reason I stayed away. I lost control of my coaching voice and it took a long time for it to resurface. I’ll write about it soon.

I’m still in Dubai. I can’t believe it has been almost nine years in this incredible city and country, which really does hold a place in my heart. The United Arab Emirates is our second home.

Let me introduce the new addition to our family. Amalia was born on 20 October 2015, and shares her birthday with her father. She completes my beautiful family.

2016 was also the year I met some very special people. After years of speaking on the phone and hearing their horror story of escaping the Syrian war, I met my aunty Hiyam and her family during a short trip to Lebanon. I also met my uncles, my mother’s brothers, one of whom lost his battle with cancer in November. It was a truly sad day, as I had only just started to lean more about my extended family. Having a base in the Middle East has allowed me to discover more about people I’d only seen in photographs during my childhood. I’ll write more about it over the next few months.

As one year ends and another is about to begin, I’d like to take this moment to wish you safe and happy holidays.

My Arabia will be back with so many wonderful stories.

Business in Arabia: Risking it all to pursue a dream

Bounce: The jumping revolution comes to the Middle East
Bounce: The jumping revolution comes to the Middle East

Australian businessman Ross Milton gave up a high-flying job to pursue a dream. MyArabia.me recently caught up with the Managing Director of Bounce to find out more about the jumping revolution in Dubai.  

Anyone who has lived in the United Arab Emirates long enough will tell you that Dubai is built on entrepreneurship.

There are two types of entrepreneurs, says Ross Milton, former global chief financial officer of Mars Food Group. The first, he says, are young and usually unrestrained by family commitments. They can tolerate risk better, because if something doesn’t pay off, they have plenty of time before retirement in which to rebound. Milton points out that these young entrepreneurs are usually unable to self-fund their ventures, and need to attract the right investors.

The second type gets to Milton’s age, (41), have saved up a reasonable amount of money and then have a crack at funding something. This is riskier, concedes Milton, who has put his life savings into creating Bounce, one of the most popular indoor sporting venues in Dubai. “I still have two young children who are at school and university is still to come.”

Ross Milton, Managing Director of Bounce Middle East
Ross Milton, Managing Director of Bounce Middle East

We meet at Bounce headquarters in Al Quoz, where we are surrounded by 80 interconnected trampolines and 500 square metres of circus-grade padding and air bags. It’s hard to believe that a year ago this was the home of dozens of offices, marble floors and slabs of concrete.

“It was extraordinary! We had big cranes tearing this place apart, cutting through the concrete, until we dropped out a whole floor,” he recalls.

It was during these times, Milton says, that he would lie awake, questioning his decision to give up a high-flying executive role to pursue a 20-year dream to start his own business.

Before moving to the United Arab Emirates in 2012, Milton was based in Los Angeles, where he was the global chief financial officer for Mars Food Group, and the company recorded $3 billion in sales. It was where he honed his entrepreneurial skills.

“As a CFO, you are the right-hand man of the CEO and you end up doing a bit of everything,” he says of his 14-year-career at Mars. Milton transferred with Mars to Dubai as the Senior Vice President of Human Resources, where he guided, trained and developed 8000 employees across Africa, India, Middle East, Commonwealth of Independent States and Central Asia. Mars, he notes, had recorded $7 billion in sales in this part of the world.

Over 150,000 people have bounced since the sporting venue opened in June 2014.
Over 150,000 people have bounced since the sporting venue opened in June 2014.

He was barely into his new role in Dubai when he decided to take the leap ‒ contrary to his long-held belief that he would start his first business back in Australia, where he has a strong personal network and a familiarity with the laws and regulations.

But in August 2013, on a visit home with his family, Milton had his first encounter with Bounce, the indoor trampoline park. Within two months, he had signed a franchise agreement, acquiring the Middle East rights.

“The United Arab Emirates, like Australia, is an entrepreneurial country. Everyone can have a crack at anything,” says Milton. “I looked at this market [Dubai], and thought, ’Oh my gosh!’ You’ve got obesity issues, kids sitting in their rooms playing games on their computers, and the climate isn’t helpful for getting outside and playing sports. As I thought more and more about it, this was the place.”

Bounce Middle East was no ordinary venture. Milton was still employed at Mars, and he says he wasn’t about to leave his job unless he could find a building and acquire the licenses.

Finding the right location was a challenge. He ruled out Jebel Ali and Dubai Investment Park as too far out for patrons. And, unlike other parts of the world where the commercial real estate market is developed, Milton discovered that none of the 30 agents he contacted had a comprehensive overview of what commercial properties were available.

“I was driving up and down the streets hoping to see a For Sale or For Rent sign,” he says, shaking his head.

The search led him to the streets of Al Quoz, a commercial area located just minutes from Mall of the Emirates. Having found the right area, his next challenge was securing a building large enough to house the space-hungry concept. Once he’d found the building, he had to get the area rezoned and obtain a sports license.

In April 2014, Milton resigned from his post at Mars, and, in June 2014, Bounce Middle East opened its doors. Since then, it has welcomed over 150,000 visitors and inspired numerous copycat businesses across Dubai.

“I learnt a lot of lessons along the way,” he says. “I think next time I would put additional clauses in contracts to give myself a little breathing space. It was a big leap. There were nights when I stared at the ceiling and wondered what I had done.”

Looking around at what he has created, Milton says, “I get to work with, train and develop young people; the average age of my team is 20 years old. I get to help develop their experience and skills.

“There is nothing better than when you have three parties running at the same time, with 60 kids running around screaming, carrying on and having a blast.”

Can you slam dunk while you're bouncing?
Can you slam dunk while you’re bouncing?

Tips

If you’re starting your first business, Milton strongly recommends you start with a franchise. Why start from scratch when there is a good concept? “You have support in branding and marketing, and assistance with execution. You just have to adapt the idea to the market.”

Milton adds, whether you’re a general manager or a business owner you’ll never be an expert in all fields. There are several key areas to understand:

  • Architecture and construction: Whether you’re starting a coffee shop or a sporting venue, you will need to think about design and layout.
  • Law: You will be dealing with contracts and tenders for construction companies.
  • Finance: Identify where the money is coming from and what the tax regulations are.
  • Personnel: If you’re planning to hire staff, what are their job descriptions? Where do you recruit them from? What benefits will they receive? And is it all in accordance with the country’s labour laws?
  • Training and development: What courses (such as first aid) will your employees need?
  • Public relations and marketing: Do you have the right digital strategy? What do you know about digital? How will you engage with, and sell into, the community? How will you stage a launch, making sure that everyone in Dubai knows about you?

Follow MyArabia.me on social media

Twitter: @my_arabia

Instagram: @arabianmum

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Coffee With…. Two Tone

Put simply, Dubai-based rapper Two Tone is the quintessential example of a person who never gave up on his teenage dream, despite getting side-tracked by building a multi-million-dollar souvenir empire.

As part of a new section on my blog, Coffee With.…., My Arabia caught up with the Moroccan-Dutch entertainer ahead of his debut Dubai performance at RedFest DXB.

You're never too old to follow your dream
You’re never too old to follow your dream

Gone are the long locks he sported during his ‘Hatin’ on You’ collaboration with Krayzie Bone, of Bone Thugs-n-Harmony; today, Two Tone has made over his image with guidance from his stylist wife, Haydee. His hair is considerably shorter, and his earlier urban style has been replaced by an eclectic combination of stylish jackets, pants and his symbolic sunglasses. After all, he is representing Dubai, a city known for its glitz and glamour, on the international music scene.

But it’s not just his image that has evolved. To secure more radio airtime, Two Tone has reworked his sound, fusing Latin and Middle Eastern beats to create hits such as ‘Senorita’ and ‘Keep on Going’, which both hit number one on iTunes.

While the United Arab Emirates has just started hearing Two Tone’s music on radio, the 38-year-old artist, whose work has often been compared with Flo Rida’s and Pitbull’s, has been building a fan base across parts of Europe and Morocco for many years.

‘Before “Senorita” was released, I had made many songs, but because they were hip-hop the radio stations couldn’t play them here, because they’re very filtered,’ he said. ‘I met with Erick Machado, a Cuban artist living in Dubai. I wanted to see the combination between Latin music and hip-hop and basically a little bit of Arabic influences.’

Born Rachid Ben Messaoud, Two Tone first discovered his love for hip-hop as a 14-year-old growing up in the Netherlands. Influenced by American West Coast hip-hop artists such as N.W.A, Snoop Dog, Ice Cube and Tupac, the youngster began memorizing their lyrics and performing at school, eventually joining a Dutch underground rap group, 252 Maindrive. Despite the group signing with a Dutch label and travelling to the United States to release their first album, Two Tone says it never eventuated, due to a dispute between the Dutch and American record companies. He left the group to pursue a solo career. Family commitments saw the rapper put his music on hold for many years, until he moved to Dubai in 2008.

However, he says, it wasn’t music that brought him to the Middle East.

‘A friend of mine had an idea to do key chains, so we bought the rights to a [Robin Ruth] franchise for the Middle East,’ he says. ‘We started from a small kiosk, selling key chains, then adding hats, bags and slippers. We now have shops in most of the malls and do customised products for Atlantis Hotel, Burj Khalifa and the Jumeriah Group.’

Success of his souvenir empire in Dubai has allowed Two Tone to focus on his music
Success of his souvenir empire in Dubai has allowed Two Tone to focus on his music

In 2011, the success of his souvenir empire allowed him to refocus on his passion.

‘My partners encouraged me to focus on my music,’ he said. ‘By that stage I felt like I was getting a little old, so I thought I’d move to the background and start producing and inspiring other people.’

Fast forward to 2015 and it looks like Two Tone’s success is building, with many projects in the pipeline.

In a Snapshot

As a young man with an Arabic background, how did your parents feel about your interest in hip-hop and rap?

They’re very supportive. They weren’t familiar with the music when I first started, but now they are very proud. I’m not embarrassing them, so that’s a good thing.

Do you prefer to write your music or freestyle?

Over the last few years I haven’t written as much. I like to freestyle and improvise because it gives you so much freedom. Now when I record a song, I don’t write it down. I go in to the booth, I put the music on and rap about the subject. And when I like something, I record it and keep going until there is a full song.

Your ultimate collaboration?

Chris Brown.

How hard is it for a rap artist to come up with a name that sticks?

A name should come naturally. When I was rapping, I noticed that when I had a slow beat I used a low tone and then, when I had to speed up my flow, I would use a higher pitch. When I was playing, many people would comment about my different sound. That’s where the name originated ‒ my ability to rap in two tones.

You just released a new song with Virgin Radio’s Kris Fade. What is ‘In it for love’ about?

There are a lot of women in Dubai who are not in it for love; they’re in it for other reasons. It’s a funny song. We were having fun in the studio and it came out good, so I said, let’s release it.

Finally, what is the next step for Two Tone?

There is another huge event coming up. It’s still confidential, but I’ll be opening for a big group in Dubai. Then I’ll be touring in Spain with one of the world’s biggest Latin artists, Romeo Santos, who had the biggest-selling album in the United States last year. I’m also in negotiations with Marc Anthony to do a few days on tour with him in Spain ‒ plus, my next single is coming out soon.

You can catch Two Tone perform his latest hits at Red Fest DXB later this month.