Coffee With…. Two Tone

Put simply, Dubai-based rapper Two Tone is the quintessential example of a person who never gave up on his teenage dream, despite getting side-tracked by building a multi-million-dollar souvenir empire.

As part of a new section on my blog, Coffee With.…., My Arabia caught up with the Moroccan-Dutch entertainer ahead of his debut Dubai performance at RedFest DXB.

You're never too old to follow your dream
You’re never too old to follow your dream

Gone are the long locks he sported during his ‘Hatin’ on You’ collaboration with Krayzie Bone, of Bone Thugs-n-Harmony; today, Two Tone has made over his image with guidance from his stylist wife, Haydee. His hair is considerably shorter, and his earlier urban style has been replaced by an eclectic combination of stylish jackets, pants and his symbolic sunglasses. After all, he is representing Dubai, a city known for its glitz and glamour, on the international music scene.

But it’s not just his image that has evolved. To secure more radio airtime, Two Tone has reworked his sound, fusing Latin and Middle Eastern beats to create hits such as ‘Senorita’ and ‘Keep on Going’, which both hit number one on iTunes.

While the United Arab Emirates has just started hearing Two Tone’s music on radio, the 38-year-old artist, whose work has often been compared with Flo Rida’s and Pitbull’s, has been building a fan base across parts of Europe and Morocco for many years.

‘Before “Senorita” was released, I had made many songs, but because they were hip-hop the radio stations couldn’t play them here, because they’re very filtered,’ he said. ‘I met with Erick Machado, a Cuban artist living in Dubai. I wanted to see the combination between Latin music and hip-hop and basically a little bit of Arabic influences.’

Born Rachid Ben Messaoud, Two Tone first discovered his love for hip-hop as a 14-year-old growing up in the Netherlands. Influenced by American West Coast hip-hop artists such as N.W.A, Snoop Dog, Ice Cube and Tupac, the youngster began memorizing their lyrics and performing at school, eventually joining a Dutch underground rap group, 252 Maindrive. Despite the group signing with a Dutch label and travelling to the United States to release their first album, Two Tone says it never eventuated, due to a dispute between the Dutch and American record companies. He left the group to pursue a solo career. Family commitments saw the rapper put his music on hold for many years, until he moved to Dubai in 2008.

However, he says, it wasn’t music that brought him to the Middle East.

‘A friend of mine had an idea to do key chains, so we bought the rights to a [Robin Ruth] franchise for the Middle East,’ he says. ‘We started from a small kiosk, selling key chains, then adding hats, bags and slippers. We now have shops in most of the malls and do customised products for Atlantis Hotel, Burj Khalifa and the Jumeriah Group.’

Success of his souvenir empire in Dubai has allowed Two Tone to focus on his music
Success of his souvenir empire in Dubai has allowed Two Tone to focus on his music

In 2011, the success of his souvenir empire allowed him to refocus on his passion.

‘My partners encouraged me to focus on my music,’ he said. ‘By that stage I felt like I was getting a little old, so I thought I’d move to the background and start producing and inspiring other people.’

Fast forward to 2015 and it looks like Two Tone’s success is building, with many projects in the pipeline.

In a Snapshot

As a young man with an Arabic background, how did your parents feel about your interest in hip-hop and rap?

They’re very supportive. They weren’t familiar with the music when I first started, but now they are very proud. I’m not embarrassing them, so that’s a good thing.

Do you prefer to write your music or freestyle?

Over the last few years I haven’t written as much. I like to freestyle and improvise because it gives you so much freedom. Now when I record a song, I don’t write it down. I go in to the booth, I put the music on and rap about the subject. And when I like something, I record it and keep going until there is a full song.

Your ultimate collaboration?

Chris Brown.

How hard is it for a rap artist to come up with a name that sticks?

A name should come naturally. When I was rapping, I noticed that when I had a slow beat I used a low tone and then, when I had to speed up my flow, I would use a higher pitch. When I was playing, many people would comment about my different sound. That’s where the name originated ‒ my ability to rap in two tones.

You just released a new song with Virgin Radio’s Kris Fade. What is ‘In it for love’ about?

There are a lot of women in Dubai who are not in it for love; they’re in it for other reasons. It’s a funny song. We were having fun in the studio and it came out good, so I said, let’s release it.

Finally, what is the next step for Two Tone?

There is another huge event coming up. It’s still confidential, but I’ll be opening for a big group in Dubai. Then I’ll be touring in Spain with one of the world’s biggest Latin artists, Romeo Santos, who had the biggest-selling album in the United States last year. I’m also in negotiations with Marc Anthony to do a few days on tour with him in Spain ‒ plus, my next single is coming out soon.

You can catch Two Tone perform his latest hits at Red Fest DXB later this month.

 

 

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In May 2008, Taghred Chandab packed her bags and her young family to go on an adventure of a lifetime. She landed in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 32-weeks pregnant with her third child, on a humid summer’s day, the desert temperature hovering above 40-degrees. The award-winning author and journalist placed a two-year deadline on the Middle Eastern journey, five years later she is still there, living on one of the world’s most luxurious man-made islands, Palm Jumeriah, in Dubai. Born and raised in Sydney, Taghred Chandab spent over 12 years working as a journalist for both News Ltd and Fairfax Media publications, was a producer at 2UE and dabbled in a little public relations, managing the media affairs of a football club and its squad of 32-egos. In 2005, she co-wrote her first book, The Glory Garage: Growing Up Lebanese Muslim in Australia, a collection of stories about Muslims living in Australia. The book was short listed for several awards, including the 2006 NSW Premier’s Award, and received the 2006 Children’s Book Council of Australia Honour Award. Seven years have passed, and while it seems like a life-time in the publishing world, for Taghred the absence from the spotlight has given her the chance to raise her three girls, Janah (8), Serene (6.5) and Alisar (5), and reacquaint herself with her Middle Eastern roots and faith. Taghred also took a break from reporting on Islamic affairs, opting to pursue her sports and entertainment dream in the Middle East. She teamed up with Tracey Holmes to co-host Sports Talk on Dubai Eye, an affiliate of the Arabian Radio Network, as well as covering some of the biggest sporting events in the region from the 2009 FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup to the 2010 FIFA Club World Cup. She released her second book title & her debut children's book, The Perfect Flower Girl in June 2012. She now heads the PR & Communications team working on Disney Live! & Disney On Ice events in the Middle East.

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