Welcome to My Arabia.

The stunning Dubai skyline has become iconic in the Middle East
The stunning Dubai skyline has become iconic in the Middle East

With millions of people around the world blogging about their experiences, it’s time I joined the chorus of writers that has made a success out of blogging.
After having lived in the UAE for six years, I think it’s now time to share my unique journey with the world.

My early years were challenging. I arrived in Abu Dhabi pregnant with my third daughter, scared and unaware of how the health system operated. I would often question my obstetrician’s decisions—and rightly so. Moving from Australia meant I had to learn to drive on the other side of the road without killing my children, any unsuspecting drivers or myself.

What makes my Arabian journey different from that of any other expat?

I was born and raised in Sydney, Australia, and am the daughter of Lebanese migrant parents. Until I moved to the UAE in 2008, I had never travelled to the Middle East. My view of the Arab world was limited to what I had seen on the evening news and to what my parents had told me about their native country. In Australia, we have a strong Middle Eastern community predominantly composed of Lebanese. But with so many issues surrounding this minority group, I’d distanced myself from my culture. As a Muslim growing up in Australia, I felt that everything in my father’s eyes was forbidden. While I looked the part of an Aussie kid, I never felt it.

The opportunity to move to the UAE was a blessing. Like many expats, we set a two-year deadline on our experience. We were lured here by the tax-free dollars and incredible expat-package, where housing, health insurance and education were all covered. I moved from suburban Sydney to Palm Jumeriah, which offered a lifestyle I knew I could not afford back home.

It has been a roller-coaster ride.

This blog will cover my personal journey, I’ve met many strange and wonderful people along the way. I became fascinated with polygamy, and I discovered during my second year here that a friend of mine was part of what I call a ‘second wives’ club. More on that later.

I had no choice but to hire help after my husband was forced to relocate to Saudi Arabia due to the global financial crisis. My daughters and I chose to stay behind until we knew his job was stable. The treatment of these domestic workers would make anyone shudder. I have plenty of stories to share on this topic.

Education, I believe, is a right and not a privilege, but tell that to the businessmen and women who take advantage of parents, charging up to USD10,000 a year for a five-year-old to start kindergarten. I often joke that I have spent my girls’ university tuition on nursery school fees. It’s true.

I reinvented my career in the Middle East. I followed my passion in sport and worked with FIFA on a number of football events—from the 2010 Club World Cup and the FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup. I was even invited to join the Beach Soccer Worldwide team in Barcelona, Spain, to travel the world promoting this fabulous sport.

Today, I work with brands such as Disney Live and Disney on Ice, building the campaigns and promoting these events in the Middle East. Mickey Mouse is my BFF.

This is both my personal and professional journey. Welcome aboard.

Posted by

In May 2008, Taghred Chandab packed her bags and her young family to go on an adventure of a lifetime. She landed in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 32-weeks pregnant with her third child, on a humid summer’s day, the desert temperature hovering above 40-degrees. The award-winning author and journalist placed a two-year deadline on the Middle Eastern journey, five years later she is still there, living on one of the world’s most luxurious man-made islands, Palm Jumeriah, in Dubai. Born and raised in Sydney, Taghred Chandab spent over 12 years working as a journalist for both News Ltd and Fairfax Media publications, was a producer at 2UE and dabbled in a little public relations, managing the media affairs of a football club and its squad of 32-egos. In 2005, she co-wrote her first book, The Glory Garage: Growing Up Lebanese Muslim in Australia, a collection of stories about Muslims living in Australia. The book was short listed for several awards, including the 2006 NSW Premier’s Award, and received the 2006 Children’s Book Council of Australia Honour Award. Seven years have passed, and while it seems like a life-time in the publishing world, for Taghred the absence from the spotlight has given her the chance to raise her three girls, Janah (8), Serene (6.5) and Alisar (5), and reacquaint herself with her Middle Eastern roots and faith. Taghred also took a break from reporting on Islamic affairs, opting to pursue her sports and entertainment dream in the Middle East. She teamed up with Tracey Holmes to co-host Sports Talk on Dubai Eye, an affiliate of the Arabian Radio Network, as well as covering some of the biggest sporting events in the region from the 2009 FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup to the 2010 FIFA Club World Cup. She released her second book title & her debut children's book, The Perfect Flower Girl in June 2012. She now heads the PR & Communications team working on Disney Live! & Disney On Ice events in the Middle East.

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